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Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis

[+] Author Affiliations
Weihua Zhou, Ying Chen

Southern Illinois University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 1230 Lincoln Drive, Mail Code 6603, Carbondale, Illinois 62901, United States

Jianping Lu, Otto Zhou

University of North Carolina, Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Curriculum in Applied Sciences and Engineering, 120 E. Cameron Avenue, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255, United States

University of North Carolina, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7295, United States

J. Electron. Imaging. 24(2), 023028 (Apr 15, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.JEI.24.2.023028
History: Received July 24, 2014; Accepted March 18, 2015
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Abstract.  As a breast-imaging technique, digital breast tomosynthesis has great potential to improve the diagnosis of early breast cancer over mammography. Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms, such as ray-tracing back projection, maximum-likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), ordered-subset MLEM (OS-MLEM), and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART), have been developed as reconstruction methods for different breast tomosynthesis systems. This paper provides a comparative study to investigate these algorithms by computer simulation and phantom study. Experimental results suggested that, among the four investigated reconstruction algorithms, OS-MLEM and SART performed better in interplane artifact removal with a fast speed convergence.

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Citation

Weihua Zhou ; Jianping Lu ; Otto Zhou and Ying Chen
"Ray-tracing-based reconstruction algorithms for digital breast tomosynthesis", J. Electron. Imaging. 24(2), 023028 (Apr 15, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JEI.24.2.023028


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