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Video stabilization based on human visual system

[+] Author Affiliations
Yun Gu Lee

Kwangwoon University, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, 447-1, Wolgye-Dong, Nowon-Gu, Seoul 139-701, Republic of Korea

J. Electron. Imaging. 23(5), 053009 (Sep 19, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JEI.23.5.053009
History: Received March 13, 2014; Revised July 17, 2014; Accepted September 3, 2014
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Abstract.  A video stabilization method based on a new concept inspired by the human visual system is presented. The human eye provides a stable scene by continuously changing the eye’s orientation in a way that always places the focused target in the center of one’s view. Similar to the human eye, the proposed algorithm focuses only on a single target object within a scene and stabilizes the target on the two-dimensional image plane by rotating a camera in three-dimensional space while most previous methods consider all objects in a video. The rotational angles of the camera along the x and y axes are simply predicted from a translational motion vector of the target object on the image plane. Hence, the proposed algorithm can provide a vivid video as if it was seen through the eye. Efficient video stabilization by approximating the human visual system is introduced, a practical method for real-time devices. Experimental results demonstrate that the visual feelings of the compensated videos are different depending on the selected target object and the approximating method provides a reasonable performance.

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Citation

Yun Gu Lee
"Video stabilization based on human visual system", J. Electron. Imaging. 23(5), 053009 (Sep 19, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JEI.23.5.053009


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