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Maximum subarray algorithms for use in astronomical imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Stephen J. Weddell

University of Canterbury, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

Tristan Read

University of Canterbury, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

Mohammed Thaher

University of Canterbury, Department of Computer Science & Software Engineering, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

Tad Takaoka

University of Canterbury, Department of Computer Science & Software Engineering, Christchurch 8140, New Zealand

J. Electron. Imaging. 22(4), 043011 (Oct 25, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.JEI.22.4.043011
History: Received December 28, 2012; Revised July 30, 2013; Accepted September 26, 2013
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Abstract.  The maximum subarray problem is used to identify the subarray of a two-dimensional array, where the sum of elements is maximized. In terms of image processing, the solution has been used to find the brightest region within an image. Two parallel algorithms of the maximum subarray problem solve this problem in O(n) and O(logn) time. A field programmable gate array implementation has verified theoretical maximum performance; however, extensive customization is required, restricting general application. A more convenient platform for this work is a graphics processor unit since it offers a flexible trade-off between hardware customization and performance. Implementation of the maximum subarray algorithm on a graphics processor unit is discussed in this article for rectangular solutions and convex extensions are explored.

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Citation

Stephen J. Weddell ; Tristan Read ; Mohammed Thaher and Tad Takaoka
"Maximum subarray algorithms for use in astronomical imaging", J. Electron. Imaging. 22(4), 043011 (Oct 25, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JEI.22.4.043011


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