Regular Articles

Effects of hyperellipsoidal decision surfaces on image segmentation in artificial color

[+] Author Affiliations
Jian Fu

Alabama A & M University, Computer Science Department, Normal, Alabama 35762

H. John Caulfield

Alabama A&M University Research Institute, P.O. Box 313, Normal, Alabama 35762

Dongsheng Wu

University of Alabama in Huntsville, Department of Mathematical Sciences, Huntsville, Alabama 35899

Trent Montgomery

Alabama A & M University, School of Engineering and Technology, Normal, Alabama 35762

J. Electron. Imaging. 19(2), 023003 (April 08, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3377146
History: Received April 03, 2009; Revised January 22, 2010; Accepted February 24, 2010; Published April 08, 2010; Online April 08, 2010
Text Size: A A A

Artificial color uses the projection of the spectrum into two or more broad, overlapping spectral bands to discriminate, pixel by pixel, among user-defined classes of objects. As initially practiced, it used a sequence of hyperspherical regions of the decision space to define class membership. Of course, a hypersphere is just a degenerate hyperellipsoid; thus, exploring the effect of loosening that degeneracy seemed appropriate. Initially, we use two-foci hyperellipsoids with a hyperellipsoidal distance metric to classify pixels with dramatic improvement in performance. We explore the work even further by allowing many foci and noting the effects of increased complexity of the decision surfaces. In the example case, three foci gave superior performance to one or two foci, but four added little improvement.

© 2010 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Jian Fu ; H. John Caulfield ; Dongsheng Wu and Trent Montgomery
"Effects of hyperellipsoidal decision surfaces on image segmentation in artificial color", J. Electron. Imaging. 19(2), 023003 (April 08, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3377146


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.