Special Section on Image Quality

Measurement and compensation of printer modulation transfer function

[+] Author Affiliations
Nicolas Bonnier

Océ Print Logic Technologies, 1 rue Jean Lemoine, Créteil, 94015 France and Telecom ParisTech, Institut Telecom, CNRS UMR 5141 LTCI, 75013 Paris, France

Albrecht J. Lindner

Océ Print Logic Technologies, 1 rue Jean Lemoine, Créteil, 94015 France and Telecom ParisTech, Institut Telecom, CNRS UMR 5141 LTCI, 75013 Paris, France

J. Electron. Imaging. 19(1), 011010 (January 13, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3272958
History: Received May 01, 2009; Revised August 12, 2009; Accepted September 17, 2009; Published January 13, 2010
Text Size: A A A

The capacity of a printing system to accurately reproduce details has an impact on the quality of printed images. The ability of a system to reproduce details is captured in its modulation transfer function (MTF). In the first part of this work, we compare three existing methods to measure the MTF of a printing system. After a thorough investigation, we select the method from Jang and Allebach and propose to modify it. We demonstrate that our proposed modification improves the measurement precision and the simplicity of implementation. Then we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of the different methods depending on the intended usage of the MTF and why Jang and Allebach’s method best matches our needs. In the second part, we propose to improve the quality of printed images by compensating for the MTF of the printing system. The MTF is adaptively compensated in the Fourier domain, depending both on frequency and local mean values. Results of a category judgment experiment show significant improvement as the printed MTF-compensated images obtain the best scores.

© 2010 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Nicolas Bonnier and Albrecht J. Lindner
"Measurement and compensation of printer modulation transfer function", J. Electron. Imaging. 19(1), 011010 (January 13, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3272958


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.