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Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

[+] Author Affiliations
Kimiyoshi Miyata

National Museum of Japanese History, Research Department, 117, Jonai-cho, Sakura-shi, Chiba 285-8502, Japan

Yuka Inoue

Bunkyo University, Faculty of International Studies, 1100 Namegaya, Chigasaki-City, Kanagawa 253-8550, Japan

Takahiro Takiguchi

Chiba University, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

Norimichi Tsumura

Chiba University, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

Toshiya Nakaguchi

Chiba University, Graduate School of Advanced Integration Science, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

Yoichi Miyake

Chiba University, Research Center for Frontier Medical Engineering, 1-33, Yayoi-cho, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8522, Japan

J. Electron. Imaging. 18(4), 043008 (November 23, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3267085
History: Received September 21, 2008; Revised September 17, 2009; Accepted October 06, 2009; Published November 23, 2009; Online November 23, 2009
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In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors’ needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors’ understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors’ interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer’s hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

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© 2009 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Kimiyoshi Miyata ; Yuka Inoue ; Takahiro Takiguchi ; Norimichi Tsumura ; Toshiya Nakaguchi, et al.
"Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions", J. Electron. Imaging. 18(4), 043008 (November 23, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3267085


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