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Spectral sensitivity optimization of color image sensors considering photon shot noise

[+] Author Affiliations
Hideyasu Kuniba

Nikon Corporation, 6-3, Nishi-ohi 1-chome, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 140-8601, Japan

Roy S. Berns

Rochester Institute of Technology, Munsell Color Science Laboratory, Center for Imaging Science, Rochester, New York 14623

J. Electron. Imaging. 18(2), 023002 (April 29, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3116562
History: Received April 17, 2008; Revised January 23, 2009; Accepted March 02, 2009; Published April 29, 2009
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Filter optimization is investigated to design digital camera color filters that achieved high color accuracy and low image noise when a sensor’s inherent photon shot noise is considered. In a computer simulation, both RGB- and CMY-type filter sets are examined. Although CMY filters collect more photons, performance is worse than for RGB filters in terms of either color reproduction or noise due to the large noise amplification during the color transformation. When RGB filter sets are used and photon shot noise is considered, the peak wavelength of the R channel should be longer (620to630nm) than the case when only color reproduction is considered: peak wavelengths 600, 550, and 450nm for RGB channels, respectively. Increasing the wavelength reduces noise fluctuation along the a* axis, the most prominent noise component in the latter case; however, color accuracy is reduced. The tradeoff between image noise and color accuracy due to the peak wavelength of the R channel leads to a four-channel camera consisting of two R sensors and G and B. One of the two R channels is selected according to the difference in levels to reduce noise while maintaining accurate color reproduction.

© 2009 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Hideyasu Kuniba and Roy S. Berns
"Spectral sensitivity optimization of color image sensors considering photon shot noise", J. Electron. Imaging. 18(2), 023002 (April 29, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3116562


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