Special Section on Biometrics: Advances in Security, Usability, and Interoperability

How the subject can improve fingerprint image quality

[+] Author Affiliations
Mary Frances Theofanos

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS. 8940, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8940

Ross J. Micheals

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS. 8940, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8940

Shahram Orandi

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS. 8940, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8940

Brian Stanton

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS. 8940, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8940

Nien Fan Zhang

National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, MS. 8940, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8940

J. Electron. Imaging. 17(1), 011007 (March 13, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2892681
History: Received June 15, 2007; Revised October 18, 2007; Accepted November 01, 2007; Published March 13, 2008
Text Size: A A A

Traditionally, the biometric field has viewed the subject as a passive source of the biometric sample rather than as an interactive component of the biometric system. But fingerprint image quality is highly dependent on the human–computer interaction and usability considerations of the acquisition system. Those factors impacting the acquisition of high-quality images must be identified, and real-time feedback for subjects to ensure acceptable quality images must be integrated into fingerprint capture systems. We report on a usability study that examined the influence of instructional materials on the user (subject) performance of a 10-print slap acquisition process. In addition, we also investigated the relationship of pressure and image quality as a mechanism to provide real-time feedback to the subject. The usability study included 300 participants who received instructions and interacted with the scanner. How information is provided to the subject on interacting with the fingerprint device does indeed affect image quality. The pressure findings are less conclusive; there was no clear relationship between image quality and pressure that could be exploited for feedback to the subject. However, a minimum pressure was required to initiate our capture process.

Figures in this Article
© 2008 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Mary Frances Theofanos ; Ross J. Micheals ; Shahram Orandi ; Brian Stanton and Nien Fan Zhang
"How the subject can improve fingerprint image quality", J. Electron. Imaging. 17(1), 011007 (March 13, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2892681


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.