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Study of the perception of three-dimensional spatial relations for a volumetric display

[+] Author Affiliations
Christoph Hoffmann

Purdue University, Computer Sciences, 305 N. University Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2066

Zygmunt Pizlo

Purdue University, Psychology, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2081

Voicu Popescu

Purdue University, Computer Sciences, 305 N. University Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2066

Paul Rosen

Purdue University, Computer Sciences, 305 N. University Street, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2066

J. Electron. Imaging. 15(3), 033002 (July 26, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2234321
History: Received June 12, 2005; Revised October 12, 2005; Accepted December 16, 2005; Published July 26, 2006
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We test perception of 3-D spatial relations in 3-D images rendered by a 3-D display and compare it to that of a high-resolution flat panel display. Our 3-D display is a device that renders a 3-D image by displaying, in rapid succession, radial slices through the scene on a rotating screen. The image is contained in a glass globe and can be viewed from virtually any direction. We conduct a psychophysical experiment where objects with varying complexity are used as stimuli. On each trial, an object or a distorted version is shown at an arbitrary orientation. The subject’s task is to decide whether or not the object is distorted under several viewing conditions (monocular/binocular, with/without motion parallax, and near/far). The subject’s performance is measured by the detectability d, a conventional dependent variable in signal detection experiments. Highest d values are measured for the 3-D display when the subject is allowed to walk around the display.

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Citation

Christoph Hoffmann ; Zygmunt Pizlo ; Voicu Popescu and Paul Rosen
"Study of the perception of three-dimensional spatial relations for a volumetric display", J. Electron. Imaging. 15(3), 033002 (July 26, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2234321


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