IMAGE DISPLAY

Performance evaluations of a manual display mapping method

[+] Author Affiliations
John D. O’Connor, Richard Vollmerhausen, Ted Corbin

US Army Research and Development Command, Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center, Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 22060-5806 E-mail: john.oconnor@nvl.army.mil

J. Electron. Imaging. 13(4), 709-713 (Oct 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1789980
History: Received Oct. 9, 2003; Revised Jan. 2, 2004; Accepted Jan. 29, 2004; Online September 30, 2004
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Current display algorithms employ a wide variety of intensity mapping schemes to convert the 10–14 bit digital sensor data to 6–8 bits for display. These include histogram equalization, local area processing, and region of interest processing. Manual display mapping (MDM) differs from these algorithms because it allows the user to manipulate the displayed intensity of different regions of the sensor output by nonlinear mapping to pixel values. The user can thus allocate or “tune” pixel intensities (gray shades) to output regions expected to contain targets. Two experiments compare the identification (ID) performance of observers viewing low-resolution images and images blurred to simulate multiple ranges. In each experiment, images were processed with an automatic algorithm and MDM. Results indicate the expected MDM range performance improvement under typical infrared imaging conditions. © 2004 SPIE and IS&T.

© 2004 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

John D. O’Connor ; Richard Vollmerhausen and Ted Corbin
"Performance evaluations of a manual display mapping method", J. Electron. Imaging. 13(4), 709-713 (Oct 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1789980


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