Special Section on Quality Control by Artificial Vision

Signal-to-noise ratio criterion for the optimization of dual-energy acquisition using virtual x-ray imaging: application to glass wool

[+] Author Affiliations
Jean-Michel Le´tang, Nicolas Freud, Gilles Peix

INSA-Lyon Scientific & Technical University, CNDRI (Nondestructive Testing using Ionizing Radiation) Laboratory, 69621?Villeurbanne cedex, France E-mail: jean-michel.letang@insa-lyon.fr

J. Electron. Imaging. 13(3), 436-449 (Jul 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1760083
History: Received Jul. 18, 2003; Accepted Feb. 25, 2004; Online July 29, 2004
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Dual-energy techniques are used to carry out selective and quantitative imaging of materials consisting of two components. We present a technique that takes advantage of a deterministic simulation tool to find the optimal x-ray spectra used in a dual-energy system and to calibrate the measurement protocol. To optimize the choice of energy spectra, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) criterion on the estimated thickness of the materials is established. To further study the reliability of the SNR criterion, it is first compared to the measurement quality, expressed by a contrast-to-noise ratio, which characterizes the input images. Then, the numerical conditioning of the linear dual-energy system of equations is investigated to probe the stability of the inversion. Once the choice of energy spectra is settled, the reconstructed values of the thickness are modeled as third-order polynomials expressed in terms of dual-energy measurements. An application to glass-wool materials is presented. © 2004 SPIE and IS&T.

© 2004 SPIE and IS&T

Topics

Glasses ; X-rays

Citation

Jean-Michel Le´tang ; Nicolas Freud and Gilles Peix
"Signal-to-noise ratio criterion for the optimization of dual-energy acquisition using virtual x-ray imaging: application to glass wool", J. Electron. Imaging. 13(3), 436-449 (Jul 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1760083


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