Special Section on Retinex at 40

Conditions for perceptual transparency

[+] Author Affiliations
Caterina Ripamonti

University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychology

Stephen Westland

Derby University, Colour and Imaging Institute, United Kingdom

Osvaldo Da Pos

University of Padua, Department of Psychology, Italy

J. Electron. Imaging. 13(1), 29-35 (Jan 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1636764
History: Received Feb. 26, 2003; Revised Aug. 5, 2003; Accepted Sep. 14, 2003; Online March 01, 2004
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We review the conditions that are necessary for the perception of transparency, and describe the spatiochromatic constraints for achromatic and chromatic transparent displays. These constraints can be represented by the generalized convergence model and are supported by psychophysical data. We present an alternative representation of the constraints necessary for transparency perception, which is based on an analogy with a model of color constancy and the invariance of cone-excitation ratios. We show that the invariant-ratios model is a special case of the generalized convergence model. We argue that the spatial relations in an image are preserved when a Mondrian-like surface is partially covered by a transparent filter, and therefore show an intriguing link between transparency perception and color constancy. Finally, we describe experiments to relate the strength of the transparency percept with the number of unique patches in the image display. We find that the greater the number of surfaces in the display that are partially covered by a transparent filter, the stronger the impression of transparency. © 2004 SPIE and IS&T.

© 2004 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Caterina Ripamonti ; Stephen Westland and Osvaldo Da Pos
"Conditions for perceptual transparency", J. Electron. Imaging. 13(1), 29-35 (Jan 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1636764


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