IMAGE DISPLAY

Image crosstalk reduction in stereoscopic laser-based display systems

[+] Author Affiliations
Michel Pommeray, Jean-Claude Kastelik, Marc Georges Gazalet

Universite de Valenciennes, Departement Opto-Acousto-Electronique, Institut d’Electronique et, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologies (UMR CNRS 8520), Le Mont Houy, F-59313 Valenciennes Cedex, France E-mail: michel.pommeray@univ-valenciennes.fr

J. Electron. Imaging. 12(4), 689-696 (Oct 01, 2003). doi:10.1117/1.1605106
History: Received Apr. 16, 2002; Revised Mar. 14, 2003; Revised May 30, 2003; Accepted Jun. 3, 2003; Online October 22, 2003
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Image cross talk is a problem specific to stereoscopic display, which influences the conspicuity of “ghost images” and the development of asthenopia. The higher the image cross talk, the lower the visual comfort for the observer, who may suffer from eye strain and headaches. The stereoscopic laser-based display system presented uses processing to provide command variables for the optical modulation device from the pixel intensities of both views of the stereo pairs. Two processing solutions, one minimizing the quadratic error and the other one canceling the image cross talk, are developed and compared using original evaluation tools. Finally, by comparing numerical results and the visual effects obtained with tests on stereo pairs, the presented results show objectively that the second processing solution is preferable. © 2003 SPIE and IS&T.

© 2003 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Michel Pommeray ; Jean-Claude Kastelik and Marc Georges Gazalet
"Image crosstalk reduction in stereoscopic laser-based display systems", J. Electron. Imaging. 12(4), 689-696 (Oct 01, 2003). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1605106


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