HALFTONING AND WATERMARKING

Morphological characterization of dithering masks

[+] Author Affiliations
Vladimir Misic, Kevin J. Parker

University of Rochester, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rochester, New York 14627

J. Electron. Imaging. 12(2), 278-283 (Apr 01, 2003). doi:10.1117/1.1556766
History: Received Apr. 20, 2001; Revised Nov. 2, 2001; Accepted Dec. 2, 2002; Online April 11, 2003
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We present some novel tools for the analysis of blue-noise binary patterns. Unlike most of the existing methods that evaluate the frequency content of a given mask or its lower order statistics, our new metrics characterize the morphological content of a mask that is quantified using simple one-pass filtering. An analytical filter expression is given. As a result, one can balance the structural content of the mask—diagonal, vertical, and horizontal interconnections of the majority (or minority) pixels—at the same level. In addition, it is possible to improve the overall mask quality by prescribing the occurrence of morphological shapes of connected pixels. Examples of morphological analysis are given to demonstrate the different qualities of blue-noise and white-noise patterns. © 2003 SPIE and IS&T.

© 2003 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Vladimir Misic and Kevin J. Parker
"Morphological characterization of dithering masks", J. Electron. Imaging. 12(2), 278-283 (Apr 01, 2003). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1556766


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