Articles

Effect of ambient light on the color appearance of softcopy images: Mixed chromatic adaptation for self-luminous displays

[+] Author Affiliations
Naoya Katoh, Kiyotaka Nakabayashi, Masahiko Ito

Sony Corporation, Research Center, 6-7-35 Kita-shinagawa, Shinagawa, Tokyo?141-0001, Japan

Shin Ohno

Sony Corporation, B&P Company, 4-16-1 Okata, Atsugi, Kanagawa?243-0024, Japan

J. Electron. Imaging. 7(4), 794-806 (Oct 01, 1998). doi:10.1117/1.482665
History: Received Sep. 15, 1997; Revised April 10, 1998; Accepted June 28, 1998
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Abstract

With the widespread use of color management systems (CMSs), users are now able to achieve device independent color across different media. However, most of the current CMSs guarantee the same color only if one sees color under a controlled viewing condition. If one sees color under a different viewing condition, the reproduced color does not match the original. The effect of ambient light on the appearance of the color of softcopy images is discussed in this article. In a typical office environment, a computer graphic monitor with a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 9300 K is widely used under an F6 fluorescent light of 4150 K CCT. In such a case, the human visual system is partially adapted to the CRT monitor’s white point and partially to the ambient light. A new adaptation model, S-LMS, is proposed to compensate for the mixed chromatic adaptation. Visual experiments were performed to evaluate the mixed chromatic adaptation. Experimental results indicated that human visual system is 60% adapted to the monitor’s white point and 40% to ambient light when viewing softcopy images. © 1998 SPIE and IS&T.

© 1998 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Naoya Katoh ; Kiyotaka Nakabayashi ; Masahiko Ito and Shin Ohno
"Effect of ambient light on the color appearance of softcopy images: Mixed chromatic adaptation for self-luminous displays", J. Electron. Imaging. 7(4), 794-806 (Oct 01, 1998). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.482665


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