Articles

Optimizing block size in motion-compensated video coding

[+] Author Affiliations
Jordi Ribas-Corbera

Sharp Laboratories of America, Digital Video Department, 5750 Northwest Pacific Rim Boulevard, Camas, Washington 98607

David L. Neuhoff

University of Michigan, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109

J. Electron. Imaging. 7(1), 155-165 (Jan 01, 1998). doi:10.1117/1.482636
History: Received Sep. 1, 1997; Accepted Oct. 1, 1997
Text Size: A A A

Abstract

Despite the widespread experience with block-based video coders, there is little analysis or theory that quantitatively explains the effect of block size on encoding bit rate, and ordinarily the block size for a coder is chosen based on empirical experiments on video sequences of interest. In this work, we derive a procedure to determine the optimal block size that minimizes the encoding rate for a typical block-based video coder. To do this, we analytically model the effect of block size and derive expressions for the encoding rates for both motion vectors and difference frames as functions of block size. Minimizing these expressions leads to a simple formula that indicates how to choose the block size in these types of coders. This formula also shows that the best block size is a function of the accuracy with which the motion vectors are encoded and several parameters related to key characteristics of the video scene, such as image texture, motion activity, interframe noise, and coding distortion. We implement the video coder and use our analysis to optimize and explain its performance on real video frames. © 1998 SPIE and IS&T.

© 1998 SPIE and IS&T

Citation

Jordi Ribas-Corbera and David L. Neuhoff
"Optimizing block size in motion-compensated video coding", J. Electron. Imaging. 7(1), 155-165 (Jan 01, 1998). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.482636


Figures

Tables

References

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.